- filtered for Latvia
Images and Species Descriptions
Text and photographs © 2011 Jørgen Lissner
The Spiders of Europe and Greenland
Family: Liocranidae (Spiny-legged Sac Spiders)
Genus: Agroeca Westring, 1861
Characters of genus: The carapace usually with clear markings in the shape of characteristic angular loops radiating from the fovea. The abdomen with vague v- or w-shaped pattern or dark oblique spots or bars arranged in rows. The posterior row of eyes markedly procurved. Metatarsus I and II with three pairs of ventral spines. The Danish species can be identified in the field by their bodycolour and size.
Agroeca brunnea (Blackwall, 1833)
Description: The largest species of the genus. Carapace reddish-brown with golden hairs, and dark markings. Abdomen golden reddish-brown somewhat shiny. Similar to A. proxima which overlap in habitat but is smaller. The eggsacks are very characteristic and look like small inverted wineglasses placed in the vegetation, and are encountered more frequently than the spider itself. The eggsacks may be snowy-white or camouflaged with earth, thereby much less conspiceous. Size: Female 7-8 mm; male 6-7 mm. Maturity: All year. Habitat: Damp or dry places with low vegetation, usually near or within forests, sometimes also moors and grassland. Range: Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France (Mainland), Germany, Great Britain (Mainland), Hungary, Italy (Mainland), Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Moldova, Netherlands, Norway (Mainland), Poland, Portugal (Mainland), Romania, Russia (Central European), Russia (Eastern European), Russia (Northern European), Russia (NW. European), Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain (Mainland), Sweden, Switzerland, Ukraine, Yugoslavia (van Helsdingen 2009.1). Global range: Palearctic (Platnick 10.0).
Juvenile.
Juvenile.
Juvenile.
Female.
Female.
Female abdomen.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Genus: Scotina Menge, 1873
Characters of genus: These are small spiders with six to ten pairs of ventral spines easily visible with a lens. The cephalothorax is darker than in the other genera of the family and shiny. The species are found at ground level among moss and detritus. The femora of the legs are light brown while more distal segments are darkened, particularly for the first pairs of legs. The two Danish species are easily separable by their markings.
Scotina palliardii (L. Koch, 1881)
Range: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Estonia, Finland, France (Mainland), Germany, Great Britain (Mainland), Latvia, Lithuania, Netherlands, Norway (Mainland), Poland, Portugal (Mainland), Romania, Russia (Eastern European), Russia (Northern European), Russia (NW. European), Slovakia, Spain (Mainland), Sweden, Switzerland, Ukraine (van Helsdingen 2009.1). Global range: Europe, Russia (Platnick 10.0).